Saturday, August 24, 2019

Dependant on question picked from below Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 3000 words

Dependant on question picked from below - Essay Example This essay examines masculinity in current society and considers whether it acts as a source of anxiety for men. There are significant differences between the genders in the way that people behave and what is expected of them. For example, it is widely recognised that males and females behave in different ways. Behavioural research has shown that males are more likely to take risks and be competitive than females . Another aspect where behaviour differs is in terms of health beliefs and behaviour that promotes good health. While females respond well to interventions that are designed to improve health, males show strong resistance. These differences are strongly associated with the perception of masculinity . Most considerations of masculinity and femininity begin with the basic assumption that men are one thing and women are something else. They are two opposites, dichotomies, distinct from one another in numerous ways. Traditional perceptions of males and females often consider tha t men are defined as themselves, while women are considered by what they do not have compared to males. Although feminism has made much progression in the area of females being considered inferior, or lacking, there is still an underlying notion that males and females are distinct from one another . How valid is this assumption? Biologically men and women are distinct from one another (with a few exceptions that are the result of chromosomal abnormalities), but does this difference in physical characteristics correspond to distinct sexual identities, one for each gender? The standard formula is for two distinct identities. On average, most men behave in a manner that is considered to be male or masculine. They wear pants, they do not wear makeup, most do not show emotions and a large number exhibit a rugged demeanour where they attempt to be strong. Likewise, women tend to be different. However, there are many people in society for whom these traditional images of males and females do not explain their behaviour patterns. For example, transsexuals are of one distinct physical gender, but behave as if they are the opposite. This is most commonly recognised in males, such as men who dress in female clothing and wear makeup . There are less extreme examples of this also. Some men are highly emotional, while others focus strongly on clothing or skin appearance, in a way that is more strongly associated with females. Therefore, within modern society, there are many different images of gender, from the typical perceptions of male and female, to those that do not conform to the recognised ‘rules’. What is masculinity in this context? Does it still exist, or are gender perceptions so fluid that there is no distinction between male and female gender identities. To understand this, it is important to first consider the concepts of masculinity and femininity and how these are perceived in modern society. Masculinity As a concept, masculinity can be difficult to define, as it means different things to different people, and it is an idea that continues to change and grow. A typical male of the 1960s is very little like the typical male of the modern era. Furthermore, the presence of people who defy gender boundaries

Friday, August 23, 2019

Political Economy (Canada and the Global Political Economy) Essay - 1

Political Economy (Canada and the Global Political Economy) - Essay Example What are the arguments supporting and against globalization? Is it possible for Canada to make free trade and globalization benefit all stakeholders in the country? In support for globalization, Lynch (2010) points out that globalization and free trade has increased the economic opportunities in developing countries. Free trade increases the ability for foreign companies to venture into new countries. For developing countries, foreign companies increase employment opportunities for both foreigner and locals. This minimizes competition in the job market. On the other hand, free trade increase the export opportunities for developing countries. Consequently, this fosters the growth of local companies. Globalization also expand the business opportunities in both developed and developing countries. Developing countries are provided with advanced technology and experience in creating products that are desired and significant in the global market. The exchange of technology improves the potential of local companies to compete fairly with international corporations (Lynch, 2010). Lynch (2010) is of the assumption globalization and free trade make developed nations take advantage of developing countries. In free trade, developed countries have more than enough products and services to export to developing countries. Consequently, developing countries have it difficult to develop their own product since their local market are dominated with imports. The increase in imports also require the import of foreign workers. This increases unemployment competition. Globalization also increases the level of labor requirements in developing countries. For this reason, the market is required to pay less for labor services. This is also influenced by the fact that globalization and free trade increase the number of foreign employees. This creates disharmony in the domestic employment market. Canada

Thursday, August 22, 2019

Role performance in an interpreted discourse process Essay Example for Free

Role performance in an interpreted discourse process Essay From the previous chapter it is clear that an interpreters role is more than that of passing messages back and forth; it is also Ð ° role that manages the communication process of exchanging those messages. In this chapter, І begin with Ð ° discussion of how the role has been and, in many ways, still is conceived. To investigate further the performance of that role and its implications for norms in interpreting, І analyze four examples of interpreter performance. Practicing interpreters are aware of the public and professional expectations of and demands on their practice, most of which are concerned with confidentiality, neutrality, accuracy, and faithfulness to the message. Interpreters often describe their role as the person in the middle by using Ð ° metaphor which conveys the image or impression that they serve as Ð ° bridge or channel through which communication happens. This channel is supposed to relay Ð ° message from one speaker to another faithfully, accurately, and without personal or emotional bias. The performance of this role has been compared to Ð ° machine, Ð ° window, Ð ° bridge, and Ð ° telephone lineamong otherswhen trying to compress the complexity of the role into Ð ° simple, singular analogy or metaphor. This perspective developed, in part, from practitioners, educators, and researchers who have devoted the bulk of their attention to interpreters working within public and monologic contexts. In these public forums interpreters usually are interpreting for speakers who speak one at Ð ° time to typically non-responsive audiences. In these events, an interpreters role appears conduit like, passive, and noninvolved. Another reason for the persistence of this perspective lies in past research on interpreting which has been done largely by cognitive psychologists and psycholinguists who have focused on the phenomena of language processing and transference of information. This research on the complexity of listening, understanding, and speaking simultaneously has produced detailed models of the psycholinguistic stages of transfer based on errors revealed in the target language production (Cokely 1984; Moser-Mercer 1978). Although these models provide better understanding and appreciation of the mental complexity of interpreting, their very nature reinforces the metaphorical image through which interpreting is perceived. Unfortunately, the force of this perspective is such that most training and professional testing still (in 1998) devote their efforts to the details of the interpreted message and its form. Although the conduit metaphors developed partially in response to Ð ° particular situational performance and to the direction of research studies, they are also used because of ordinary perceptions about the nature of language and communication. Lakoff and Johnson (198o) found that although most people think of metaphors as devices of poets and rhetorical style, they are prevalent in our everyday lives because they allow us to present our conceptual systems through language. Metaphors structure how we think about and perceive our everyday lives. Reddy ( 1979) explains how ordinary language use portrays language as Ð ° conduit which passes on Ð ° speakers thoughts and ideas to Ð ° listener whose only task is to unwrap the thoughts and ideas that have been transmitted through Ð ° conduit and thus hides aspects of the communication experience. The words we use to talk about how ideas are shared are indicative of Ð ° conduit notion. For example, І gave you that idea. It seems hard to see Ð ° metaphor here at all. The word give seems ordinary enough until we ask ourselves if ideas have Ð ° concrete substance that can be given to someone else. These ordinary metaphors convey the sense that meaning actually resides in words, phrases, and sentences as Ð ° tangible object to be inserted or taken out. These metaphors also lead us to particular ways of thinking about the originator of the message, the message itself, and the receiver of the message. For example, Try to pack more thoughts into fewer words. This type of expression blames the speaker for failing to put enough meaning in or failing to put the meaning in the right place. Equally, in the logic of Ð ° conduit metaphor, the receiver must unpack the meaning from the words. Let me know if you find any good ideas in the talk. Its as though ideas can be inserted into words and sentences. The conduit metaphor implies Ð ° whole framework of basic assumptions about language, such as language functions like Ð ° conduit transferring thoughts from one person to another, words accomplish Ð ° transfer of ideas by containing the thoughts or feelings in the words and conveying them to others, and people can extract exactly the same idea, thought or feeling by simply receiving the words. These everyday metaphors mold our perceptions about language and communication Conduit metaphors that abound in the fields of communication, psychology, language, and information processing have been naturally brought into the field of interpreting. It is easy to see how Ð ° communication process involving Ð ° supposedly neutral or passive third party accepts Ð ° conduit-type metaphor as Ð ° way of defining itself. Although these metaphors clearly respond to Ð ° need, they also carry double messages. Certainly they convey the idea of transferring messages, but, at the same time, they call to mind images of disengagement and noninvolvement on any other level. Frequently, interpreters are called on by those who use their services to be flexible and in fact are called upon by their own colleagues to be so. Standards of ethical practice extensively, sometimes exhaustively, list what interpreters should not do, but they seldom explain what interpreters can, or should do, or where or how flexibility should be exercised. Consequently, discussions of practice fall back on what interpreters should not do, or what interpreters may do within the guidelines and wind up being discussions of ethics. In addition to creating metaphors to describe role performance, interpreters (and others) tend to idealize conversational behavior even though their experience with interaction violates both their notions of relaying messages and of the way conversations should occur. In private conversations, interpreters confess to breaking the rules while also admitting that their rule-breaking behavior was successful. What interpreters actually know (intuitively or objectively) and do is complex from both the perspective of psycholinguistic processes and also from the perspective of interactive communication systems as Ð ° whole. Interpreters are not simply processing information and passively passing it back and forth. Their task requires knowledge of Ð ° discourse system that includes grammar, language use, organization, participant relationships, contextual knowledge, and socio-cultural knowledge. Interpreters must also have the ability to adapt this knowledge quickly to size up Ð ° situation, anticipate problems, and decide on solutions within seconds which means they operate within an emergent system of adaptability. Because standards of practice have developed before we have described and analyzed what interpreters do as they work, interpreters use the language of ethical behavior to talk about their job performance. one way in which interpreting as Ð ° discourse process can work for interpreters is in providing new ways to describe, name, and discuss the interpreting process. As this study and the work of Wadensjo (1992), Metzger (1995), and others have shown, interpreters interact in multiple ways within the communicative event of interpreting.

Wednesday, August 21, 2019

Communication and professional relationships with children, young people and adults Essay Example for Free

Communication and professional relationships with children, young people and adults Essay Explain how you use effective communication in developing positive relationships with children, young people and adults. Why is this important? 1. 1 In developing positive relationships we use effective communication in several ways. We use it to: †¢help us better understand a situation or person which can help to determine our approach when engaging with them. †¢build trust and respect. If individuals feel comfortable speaking with us and feel they can approach us at any time on any subject, they are more likely to co-operate and look favourably on any suggestions made. †¢show that we care about the welfare and future of an individual and will do our best to aid in their success †¢ensure that all parties are agreed upon the same goal, making sure that everyone is clear about the final aim and how it will be achieved. †¢build and maintain a positive working environment where creativity and learning can flourish. It is important to do this because poor communication can lead to misunderstandings, lack of trust and conflict. Without a positive relationship you are unlikely to gain support and co-operation and find it challenging to achieve a good outcome from any situation. Explain the principles of relationship building with children, young people and adults 1. 2 When trying to develop positive relationships there are several principles to follow. Firstly effective communication is essential. You must be clear in what you say and ensure you have been understood correctly. At the end of a communication you can reiterate your key points and if necessary outline responsibilities and actions. Also be sure to use language appropriate to the person with whom you are communicating. When speaking with young children keep key points to a minimum and ask them to repeat what you have said. Secondly, take time to listen to others and try to understand their point of view. Use active listening techniques to show that you are interested in what they are saying and respond appropriately. Also make sure that, if you tell someone you will get back to them, you do get back to them. This will help engender a sense of trust and respect. It is also essential that you show respect for the person with whom you are communicating. Remember their name and details of how they like to be addressed and issues which are personal to them. Recalling details of their lives adds to the feeling that you are genuinely interested in them and their welfare. When communicating be sure to acknowledge the individual. Accommodate any religious and cultural beliefs and show that you value these differences. Be considerate of the person’s situation trying to understand and accommodate any issues which may influence their feelings, actions and responses. Finally, remain positive and retain a sense of humour. Laughter is a good way to break the ice and relieve tension in a stressful situation. Explain how different social, professional and cultural contexts may affect relationships and the way people communicate 1. 3 There are several ways in which social, professional and cultural contexts may affect our relationships and the way we communicate. We must remember that communication is not just verbal and context will influence the way we act, what we wear, how we communicate and what we say. In a social setting our actions, language and dress may be less formal. If we have colleagues and parents from school as friends outside of school, then we might perhaps greet them with a hug and a wave. Our language might incorporate slang and jokes and conversation might be more generic and less serious. We might be more casual in our attire and the situation would suggest whether this is acceptable. For example, you would not be expected to attend a party wearing your best suit. The manner in which we communicate socially is also likely to be different from a professional setting. As well as telephone and face to face conversations we might also engage via text message, email and social media sites and we would be unlikely to write a letter to someone we might see daily. Communications might, for example, utilise text speak and jargon and not necessarily demand an immediate response if any at all. In a professional context you would be expected to act, speak and dress more formally. Your actions language and clothing should match the severity of the issue which you will address and show appropriate respect for the location and people with whom you are meeting. If participating in a parent/ teacher meeting at school for example the same people you greeted with a hug the night before would be better greeted with perhaps a handshake to highlight the position you hold in this scenario. Our language would be more formal and depending who was present we might try to eliminate jargon to ensure clarity and minimise misunderstandings. Similarly again our clothing would be more formal to identify the position we hold and show respect for those involved in any meeting. When contacting people professionally the use of social media sites would not be appropriate to discuss any matters relating to school, pupils or staff. Text messages might be appropriate to inform parents/carers of a school social event for example but to arrange a meeting or discuss an important matter it would be more appropriate to speak with a parent/carer or write a letter if the contact needs to be documented. When working with outside agencies email, for ease of use and speed, has become the standard form of communication but again when broaching a sensitive or important issue, a phone call or face to face meeting might be preferred. Emails can easily be misread which can lead to misunderstanding and conflict. When speaking we can use tone of voice to help ensure a point is understood correctly and face to face we can use body language in the same way. The timeframe in which we contact someone or reply to a communication can also affect relationships. When someone has taken the time to contact you they will expect a response to show that you value their contact and it should be made in the same manner or more personally. Responding to a phone call with an email, for example, could be seen as rude and deter future contact. Similarly, delaying a response could suggest that you do not value the input of the individual or consider them or their issue to be important and bring about the same result. Finally, we need to consider the cultural differences of those with whom we interact. Different cultures may also have different standards in terms of behaviour, dress, communication and contact. Actions could be misinterpreted and cause offence leading to the breakdown of a relationship. If you are meeting with someone from a different culture it may be worth doing some research and asking their preferred form of contact etc. to show that you value their beliefs. However, whilst it may be detrimental not to account for cultural differences you could see the same consequences if you assume differences because of background or race when actually there are none. What skills do you need to communicate with children and young people 2. 1 Communication is still a relatively new thing for children and young people and they may not be used to asking questions and holding conversations. One skill required to communicate effectively is giving children and young people opportunities to speak. As adults we are inclined to think that we know what children are thinking and feeling and try to tell them this or fill the gaps in their speech. Whilst we should continue to try and communicate with children as often as possible we should ensure it is a two-way conversation and not a one-way stream of instructions. We should remain patient and allow children time to organise their thoughts and formulate their sentences. When a child is relaxed and at ease they will be more forthcoming. Children may be shy and reluctant to say more than a few words if they feel you are not interested in what they have to say. Using positive body language we can encourage children to speak out. We should come down to the child’s level, face them and maintain eye contact. Remaining focussed on the child rather than continuing with another task will confirm your interest and appropriate facial expressions will show that you are listening and have understood what they are saying. Active listening is another key skill. Be interested and make appropriate responses whilst the child is speaking to confirm that you are really listening. Add to this by repeating back what the child has said to ensure your understanding is correct and by giving positive comments when they have finished. Asking open questions will extend the conversation giving the child more practice, boost the child’s confidence so they are encouraged to communicate more and model a real conversation for them to learn from. Finally, we must also ensure that communication is appropriate for the child or young person and be able to adapt the style we use. Depending on the age and ability of the child we may be able to simply converse or might need to incorporate visual support or play into the communication. We should not assume children and young people will not understand but instead make our communication clear, use vocabulary which is appropriate to their age and encourage questioning. Give a detailed explanation of how you adapt communication with children and young people for: 2. 2 aThe age of the child or young person When communicating with younger children you should try choose a setting which is familiar to the child and where they are more confident – their favourite area of the classroom for example. Get down to the level of the child perhaps sitting on the carpet and use body language to make them feel more comfortable – ensure you are facing the child, smile, nod, turn toward them, keep your arms open and remove any barriers between you. Younger children will require more reassurance and perhaps more physical contact. They may feel more confident holding your hand or sitting close together. Vocabulary should be kept simple and sentences short, broken down into easy steps. The same point may need to be repeated several times in different ways and it is helpful to provide examples based around their own experiences. If a child is very reluctant to communicate you may want to use puppets to speak through, include pictures or props to help them engage or perhaps incorporate your communication into a favourite game. The attention span of younger children is very short and you must also account for this. Monitor the length of time you spend together and include attention switches to maintain their interest: change your method of communication, switch speakers, move location, ask questions etc. Older children and young people will still need to feel comfortable in your company but are more independent and will require less reassurance and physical contact. They are more familiar with the school environment so will find it easier communicate in different settings but will more comfortable in a setting they have used before. Older children often view themselves as grown up and will appreciate being treated accordingly. Positive body language will still be beneficial in encouraging a child to speak but it will no longer be necessary to sit on the floor. Language and vocabulary should be more mature and sentences can be more complex. It may also not be necessary to repeat a point so often unless it is something new and above that person’s ability level. Examples can be drawn from a variety of sources as their experiences are wider and additional materials should be more sophisticated such as written texts or †you tube† clips. Older children are more aware of themselves and can be easily embarrassed. They will benefit from confidence boosting reminders of how well they are progressing and positive re-enforcement. They will, however, withdraw and react negatively if patronised, preferring to be treated with respect and spoken to honestly. With age attention span also increases so it is still necessary to include attention switches to maintain focus but not as frequently. bthe context of the communication We will encounter children in a variety of situations at school and it will be necessary to adapt our communication accordingly. Primarily our contact will be made inside school during a learning activity. In this case we need to remain quite formal, be directive and model the behaviour we require through our own actions. Ground rules should be laid down in clear, concise Instructions and the learning objectives highlighted to ensure all children fully understand what we expect and are trying to achieve from the lesson. There will be other children in the same area working on separate activities so we need to make our lesson interesting to retain the attention of our group but not distract the others. We can do this through tone of voice, choice of vocabulary and supplementary resources but must be wary not to overexcite the group because of the other learners present. If your activity is away from other learners then it may be possible to incorporate physical activity and allow greater expression. Distractions will be plentiful and we will need to encourage and focus our learners through positive re-enforcement and challenges. If appropriate to the task we should encourage discussion through questioning but keep discussion restricted to the subject at hand. In a more social setting, for example the playground, we can be less formal and more relaxed in our approach. This would be reflected in our body language, tone of voice and vocabulary. These times can be used as opportunities to build relationships and get to know the children better. Children can be encouraged to discuss outside interests and we might share our own experiences to help form a bond. Whilst it may be necessary to give little reminders of school rules to avoid bad behaviour it should not be necessary to outline them in full and they can be made in a more playful and conspiratorial manner – a helpful friend rather than a figure of authority. Although conversation might be more light hearted we must still remember to maintain the relationship of teacher and pupil. A school trip, however, is a more social event, but still a learning activity and the degree of formality should remain on a similar level to the classroom. The formality of the pupil teacher relationship should remain so the children understand that you â€Å"are in charge†. Children will need to be reminded often of their objectives but communication might be more light hearted and children allowed to speak more freely, discussing outside interests highlighted by the current situation. Outside the school environment they will be excited and more forgetful of their code of conduct. It will not always be possible to speak with the whole group when on a trip so we should communicate through our own behaviour, modelling what we expect from the children: remaining focussed, respectful, and responsible.

Tuesday, August 20, 2019

Activist Reflector Theorist And Pragmatist

Activist Reflector Theorist And Pragmatist Activists engage oneself totally without unfairness in fresh ideals. It makes them passionate concerning everything new. Whiles Theorists adjust and incorporate observe into difficult however reasonably theories. They choose to be perfectionists who will not take it easy until stuff are organised moreover Pragmatists are eager on experimenting ideas, skills and theories to see if that work in practice. They completely look out for new ideas and acquire the first chance toward testing applications. Lastly Reflectors are fond of reserved to deliberate on experiences and examine them from numerous perspectives. They gather information first hand and like to reflect about it carefully prior to conclusion Honey and Mumford (1982). Furthermore, (Smith, 2003) indicates that, majority of people have a preference in relating to participating in, taking in and processing report to permit individuals to learn. People take on diverse learning styles where best allows people to learn more excellent way. So far, there has been a huge test with the aim to change a persons learning style (Sprenger, 2003). Conversely, students and a lot of professionals note down that, learning achieved from practical experience is more meaningful and relevant than that acquired in the lecture room (Quinn 2000). Making certain that, any student that has a good learning outcome, it is imperative that the learning setting is sensibly, competently, and sensitively helpful to everyone learning within it. Clarke et al. (2003) remarks that, nursing training adds high price on knowledge in the clinical environment; the quality of these clinical setting has a considerable influence on learning process for student nursing. Honey and Mumford (1992) talks about four different learning styles; they portray learners as activists, pragmatists, theorists and reflectors. They added that, though lots of individual had two or more learning styles they may also had a one style preference. To guarantee myself a good learning experience on placement, it was essential for me as student nurse to be conscious about all preferred learning style as practice training is crucial element of nursing program. During placement, in discussion with my mentor, it was established that she preferred a more practical experience therefore she favoured a pragmatist approach to learning. I therefore incorporated her preferred learning style into my planned as a student nurse. Morton-Cooper and Palmer (2000) support that though, in placement the mentor acts as a teacher, it is required for a student nurse to mature into the progress of their learning needs. However to the results of the Honey and Mumford learning style questionnaire, I agree to a high reflector mindset. I consent with the greater part of the report of a reflector, which totally describes me. A Reflector is a careful person who prefers to take a back seat in group discussions (Honey and Mumford, 1992). Being less assertive and tending to hold back from participation, I believe that I will work well and learn more efficiently if play around an activist, as one would be able to encourage me to tackle situations via a more straight out approach. This would enhance my participation in group activities and discussions. According to the result of my learning style questionnaire, Honey and Mumford (1992) test says, I am a very attentive person, as this is one of the potentials of a reflector. I totally consent along this because I constantly akin to pay attention to each person in the group attentively. The opportunity of gaining from diverse viewpoint and different angles has help with my findings. Nonetheless, a likely weakness that I have found within me as a reflector is that, I take too long in doing certain duties. For instance, all through my previous assignment, I spent lengthy time to finish it, because my preparation stage took me a long to get ready. I used up a long time in searching for ideas prior to starting my assignment, this may be due to me, being extra careful on how am going to write this assignment. Even though, this brings out my careful mindset, I do not have the same opinion with the report that someone who is reflector does not take risks. I sometimes like to tread out of my ease to experience new things I have never done before to expand my knowledge. For instance, I chose to leave my home and common environment in London to study in Hertfordshire. Kenworthy and Nicklin (2000) comments, the more relaxed and secure a student feels inside the surroundings, there is expectation that successful learning will take place and the student will be encourage towards learning. Moreover, prior to starting this programme for a student nurse, it is essential to know that, at present we have diverse learning theories and styles to think about. Reece and Walker 2003) utter that there has been write down concerning the means in which people learn and many theories on the ways of effectively learning. The talk was that, the key theories are Behaviorism, Cognitive and Humanism. Regarding, the Behaviorism theory, the learning surroundings is essential to knowledge, and if this surroundings is accurate, learning comes as links are done among incentive, reaction and support (Quinn, 2000a). The Cognitive theory indicate learning like an internal procedure that include high order rational actions like remembrance, thoughts, analytic, insight and way of thinking. (Hand 2006). With Humanistic learning theory (Maslow 1968) is based on the faith that human own two basic desires, a call for growth and a call for positive view through others. It also shows as the most holist ic approach because it is interested in the way in which it compel and inspire of a person to learn. (Reece and Walker 2003) support that these theories too relay on largely on the pressure of the surroundings that might hold back or assist the learning path. In addition, it is vital for me to enhance my learning skill as a reflector. I have planned a number of ways to use prior to, through, and following lectures to help me succeed in this programme. As my weaker style is activist, the initial part of my plan is to create opportunities to initiate and to participate and have have fun in group discussion in class. These give me a head up as to situation that will possibly require action without planning in the lectures. (Heath 2001) support that, discovery of learning strategies in union with person learner preferences is key action in keeping and developing the value of learning programme. The improved potential learning opportunity and result gain from such discovery might have a supportive impact on student nurse. Moreover, when I realise my preferred learning style and the teaching style of my mentor in practice is different. I work out an action plan to support myself and to go on to succeed on this programme, I have to support my weaker style to get used to classroom environment by accepting my preferred learning style, though I am Reflector learner. Nevertheless, research establishes that, growing variety of tuition means used have not been connected with an enhancement knowledge result. However, the truth is that, throughout developing studentsà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢ understanding of their individual learning style, student are enhanced to take charge for their own learning, which improved their learning results (Fritz 2002) Upon reflection, I think learning styles assist me to recognise myself and allow me to identify how to develop myself. With the assessment outcome, I discern and know myself better and have learned from different learning styles. This has thought me why understanding of learning styles is useful to me as a student nurse. Nursing practice Reflects has been positive as the 1980à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢s (Jasper 2003). (Johns 1995) indicate the practice of reflection can be use to evaluate, realisation and study through our live experience. (Jasper 2003) too support that reflective practice is another means you can gain knowledge from experience. In terms of training for healthcare professions, it is identified as a fundamental instrument intended for students to build the relations connecting theory and practice. As a student nurse, it is important for me to realise the worth of reflecting upon my experiences in learning to enhance my prospect learning. In a nut shell, all the way through this module, I boast of higher comprehension and important consciousness of different learning styles. I have been confident towards my own prefer learning style; hence enable me toward completely support myself in my weaker style. Understanding learning styles has undoubtedly revealed the force that it can have on me as student nurse. I currently believe that, I am more prepared to incorporate my preferred learning styles into practice. Since this will be real a huge profit to my prospect profession.

Monday, August 19, 2019

Essay --

In the last 40 years, media influence has grown fast with the today`s advance technology. First there was a radio, then a newspapers, magazines, television and now there is a radical type of connection which has revolutionized the whole world that is the internet. Media is a way for the members of the society to keep themselves informed about what is happening and/or what will happen all around the world while they are staying at home, work or even on a vacation. It is also can be considered as one of the major source of entertainment. Media technology and communication is necessary in our day to day activities, playing major role in our lives such as education, migrant, personal relationship, job expansion, marketing of new products and services etc. internet has given us a lot of confidence on those media tools which have kept us close to and up to date to what is happenings around the world such as entertainment, educational activities, world wide political issue, global news, foreign market activities. It has proven studies and research that the media significant negative impact on our daily lives, especially young people under the age of 18 by watching movies and games violence. Until the mid of the last century most adolescents spend their free time together with adults so most of their behaviour and activities of this social group are to be monitored by the adult surrounding them. so teenager get the abilities they need in society to get well-integrated. Until that time parents, brothers, sisters and relatives were the most important examples for adolescents and children. After the developing of technology mostly everything has been changed this had effects on the social behavior and relationships of young people. The ... ...hough media is linked with spreading fake news. Also strengthen public relations with the young generation and continuous communication and exchange of ideas and opinions, including, for example, communicate via messages, pictures, or Videos through the Internet using some programs such as facebook or Twitter. Media nowadays is influencing all people almost every hour of everyday. It is an unbelievably strong force that has very few limitations. The force of media is changing the way we live our life, it seems that no one can go a whole day without knowing what exactly is going on around the world. Like it or not, media is more influential than the President and will continue to be until the world is changed. Indeed there is a negative effect of media as much as its positive one but its all depends on you and how you want it to affect you and the people around you. Essay -- In the last 40 years, media influence has grown fast with the today`s advance technology. First there was a radio, then a newspapers, magazines, television and now there is a radical type of connection which has revolutionized the whole world that is the internet. Media is a way for the members of the society to keep themselves informed about what is happening and/or what will happen all around the world while they are staying at home, work or even on a vacation. It is also can be considered as one of the major source of entertainment. Media technology and communication is necessary in our day to day activities, playing major role in our lives such as education, migrant, personal relationship, job expansion, marketing of new products and services etc. internet has given us a lot of confidence on those media tools which have kept us close to and up to date to what is happenings around the world such as entertainment, educational activities, world wide political issue, global news, foreign market activities. It has proven studies and research that the media significant negative impact on our daily lives, especially young people under the age of 18 by watching movies and games violence. Until the mid of the last century most adolescents spend their free time together with adults so most of their behaviour and activities of this social group are to be monitored by the adult surrounding them. so teenager get the abilities they need in society to get well-integrated. Until that time parents, brothers, sisters and relatives were the most important examples for adolescents and children. After the developing of technology mostly everything has been changed this had effects on the social behavior and relationships of young people. The ... ...hough media is linked with spreading fake news. Also strengthen public relations with the young generation and continuous communication and exchange of ideas and opinions, including, for example, communicate via messages, pictures, or Videos through the Internet using some programs such as facebook or Twitter. Media nowadays is influencing all people almost every hour of everyday. It is an unbelievably strong force that has very few limitations. The force of media is changing the way we live our life, it seems that no one can go a whole day without knowing what exactly is going on around the world. Like it or not, media is more influential than the President and will continue to be until the world is changed. Indeed there is a negative effect of media as much as its positive one but its all depends on you and how you want it to affect you and the people around you.

Commanding Lady Fortune: Machiavelli’s Theory of History Essay

Commanding Lady Fortune: Machiavelli’s Theory of History Machiavelli opens his Discourses on Livy by declaring that what will follow will be entirely revolutionary—â€Å"a path yet untrodden by anyone†Ã¢â‚¬â€but then quickly backs down from such assertions, shifting his focus away from his own efforts to the modern views of the ancients, and leaving the nature of this revolutionary undertaking ambiguous (Discourses, 5) . Indeed, the purpose of the whole work is repeatedly skirted in the preface. Machiavelli instead focuses on the distinction between the moderns and the ancients, mourning the superficial modern adoption of ancient ideas in art and law that lacks a deeper understanding of the philosophical underpinnings of ancient thought. He leaves us with only a vague description of his purpose in writing the Discourses—â€Å"so that those who read these statements of mine can more easily draw from them that utility for which one should seek knowledge of histories† (Discourses, 6). What the specific utility of history is, however, and what is so novel about his treatment of it, Machiavelli does not say. However, within the preface, and throughout his subsequent treatment of the idea of history in both the Discourses and The Prince, it becomes clear that he is indeed arguing something revolutionary through his use of history as a guide for politics. He chastises the moderns for â€Å"judging that imitation is not only difficult but impossible—as if heaven, sun, elements, men had varied in motion, order, and power from what they were in antiquity,† that is, for being deceived by Christianity into believing that its inception had fundamentally altered the nature of the world, and that a distinction between the ancients and the moderns is anything... ...lf than of the prince he has been hired to serve, meaning that, because Machiavelli also believes in a human nature that is at its foundation, deeply self-serving, a monarch can have no true advisors and is doomed to failure (Prince, 93). In a republic, however, men like Machiavelli are free to look out for their own good while charting a course for the state, as both goods are aligned (Discourses, 130). While the prince of a republic may himself only possess the second kind of mind and be unable by his nature to come to such a broad understanding of history and the causality of human events that Machiavelli has, it is enough that he has among his advisors such men as Machiavelli. Thus, ultimately, Machiavelli’s â€Å"yet untrodden path† turns out to be the creation of a method for government that is premised on the ability to master every kind of manifestation of fortune. Commanding Lady Fortune: Machiavelli’s Theory of History Essay Commanding Lady Fortune: Machiavelli’s Theory of History Machiavelli opens his Discourses on Livy by declaring that what will follow will be entirely revolutionary—â€Å"a path yet untrodden by anyone†Ã¢â‚¬â€but then quickly backs down from such assertions, shifting his focus away from his own efforts to the modern views of the ancients, and leaving the nature of this revolutionary undertaking ambiguous (Discourses, 5) . Indeed, the purpose of the whole work is repeatedly skirted in the preface. Machiavelli instead focuses on the distinction between the moderns and the ancients, mourning the superficial modern adoption of ancient ideas in art and law that lacks a deeper understanding of the philosophical underpinnings of ancient thought. He leaves us with only a vague description of his purpose in writing the Discourses—â€Å"so that those who read these statements of mine can more easily draw from them that utility for which one should seek knowledge of histories† (Discourses, 6). What the specific utility of history is, however, and what is so novel about his treatment of it, Machiavelli does not say. However, within the preface, and throughout his subsequent treatment of the idea of history in both the Discourses and The Prince, it becomes clear that he is indeed arguing something revolutionary through his use of history as a guide for politics. He chastises the moderns for â€Å"judging that imitation is not only difficult but impossible—as if heaven, sun, elements, men had varied in motion, order, and power from what they were in antiquity,† that is, for being deceived by Christianity into believing that its inception had fundamentally altered the nature of the world, and that a distinction between the ancients and the moderns is anything... ...lf than of the prince he has been hired to serve, meaning that, because Machiavelli also believes in a human nature that is at its foundation, deeply self-serving, a monarch can have no true advisors and is doomed to failure (Prince, 93). In a republic, however, men like Machiavelli are free to look out for their own good while charting a course for the state, as both goods are aligned (Discourses, 130). While the prince of a republic may himself only possess the second kind of mind and be unable by his nature to come to such a broad understanding of history and the causality of human events that Machiavelli has, it is enough that he has among his advisors such men as Machiavelli. Thus, ultimately, Machiavelli’s â€Å"yet untrodden path† turns out to be the creation of a method for government that is premised on the ability to master every kind of manifestation of fortune.